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Dermatologists offer free skin cancer screenings on Melanoma Monday 2018

University of Minnesota Health dermatologists will offer free skin cancer screenings at two locations on May 7, 2018, to coincide with Melanoma Monday.
University of Minnesota Health dermatologists will offer free skin cancer screenings from 12 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on May 7, 2018, at University of Minnesota Health Clinics and Surgery Center and University of Minnesota Health Maple Grove Clinics from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.
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University of Minnesota Health dermatologists will offer free skin cancer screenings at University of Minnesota Health Clinics and Surgery Center and University of Minnesota Health Maple Grove Clinics on Monday, May 7, 2018.

The screenings will be offered as part of Melanoma Monday, a national event promoted by the American Academy of Dermatology and the Minnesota Dermatological Society to raise awareness of skin cancer and encourage regular skin examinations. The screenings will be available the following times at each location:

Our dermatologists will perform full body checks or simple spot checks on suspicious lesions, depending on the patient’s preference. Screenings will be granted on a first-come-first-serve basis, with no appointment necessary.

Learn more about University of Minnesota Health dermatology care.

In addition to the skin cancer screening, our dermatologists will be available to discuss:

  • Skin cancer basics, including prevalence, risk factors, treatments, etc.
  • Prevention tips, such as sunscreen use and protective clothing
  • Myths regarding sun protection like “base tans,” tanning beds and others

Skin cancers fall into three categories: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma. Basal cell carcinoma is most common type, while squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common. Researchers estimate that 3.3 million people in the United States were diagnosed with basal cell or squamous cell skin cancer in 2012, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Melanoma is less common, but is the deadliest form of skin cancer. If melanoma is not detected at an early stage, it can spread to other parts of the body and is potentially lethal. 

Read more about skin cancer types and treatment.

Skin cancers can appear anywhere on the body but are most common on sun- exposed skin, such as the back and shoulders for men and legs for women. People should watch for moles that change in size, color or shape. An asymmetrical mole, a darkly pigmented mole, or one with an irregular border should raise a red flag. A mole does not have to be raised to be dangerous—in many cases, flat, dark lesions are cause for concern. 

UPDATE:

On Melanoma Monday 2018, we provided free screenings to 238 individuals at our Minneapolis and Maple Grove locations combined. Our dermatologists detected 11 suspected cases of skin cancers and recommended that patients receive treatment. Within those 11 cases, 3 suspected melanoma lesions were identified, the most dangerous type of skin cancer. 

  • Basal cell carcinoma - 6
  • Squamous cell carcinoma - 2
  • Melanoma - 3
  • Dysplastic nevus - 10

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