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VIDEO: Medical ablation is the answer for 70-year-old atrial fibrillation patient

After a medical ablation performed by a University of Minnesota Health Heart Care expert, atrial fibrillation patient Sidney Schuyler, 70, says his condition is “radically improved.”
70-year-old Sidney Schuyler was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and received a medical ablation through University of Minnesota Health Heart Care. After the procedure, Sidney's condition radically improved. "I am back to doing all the things I did when I was much younger,” Schuyler said.
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Atrial fibrillation patient Sidney Schuyler is what you can call a “total cure.”

Diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, Schuyler, 70, came to Cardiac Electrophysiologist Lin Yee Chen, MD, who is affiliated with University of Minnesota Health Heart Care. Atrial fibrillation, or AF, is the most common heart arrhythmia in adults, and occurs when an abnormal electrical signal passing through the upper chambers of the heart—or atria—causing them contract irregularly and rapidly. This effect known as fibrillation.

Scroll down to watch as Sidney Schuyler talks about his atrial fibrillation experience.

Advanced age, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and obesity are known risk factors for the condition, according to Chen. The condition is linked to a heightened risk for stroke, heart failure and dementia.

Schuyler was interested in undergoing a medical ablation. During the procedure, a specialist uses heat or cold energy to destroy the source of the rogue electrical impulses. In other cases, the care provider may isolate the area by ablating tissue around the source, thus preventing the electrical impulses from spreading to the atria.

LEARN MORE ABOUT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION TREATMENT OPTIONS THROUGH UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA HEALTH HEART CARE.

Though Schuyler was apprehensive about the procedure, he decided to have it after consulting with Chen and learning more about the process. Schuyler elected to have the procedure at University of Minnesota Medical Center, where he stayed overnight for monitoring.

“After that, my condition was radically improved, what you can call a total cure,” Schuyler said. “My quality of life is vastly improved, and I am back to doing all the things I did when I was much younger.”

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