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PHOTOS: Minnesota Vikings Vice President Donates $1 Million to Children's Hospital

The donation will establish “Carolyn’s Comforts,” a children’s cancer emergency assistance fund.
Minnesota Vikings Vice President of Legal Affairs & Chief Administrative Officer Kevin Warren donated $1 million to the University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital to establish “Carolyn’s Comforts,” a pediatric cancer emergency assistance fund.
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"If you do anything to help a child, the world is better by it.”

Minnesota Vikings Vice President of Legal Affairs and Chief Administrative Officer Kevin Warren shared those words of wisdom on Thursday just before donating $1 million to the University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital.

Warren’s gift will establish “Carolyn’s Comforts,” a children’s cancer emergency assistance fund designed to help families manage the difficulties that come with a cancer diagnosis. The fund is named in honor of Warren’s late sister, Carolyn Elaine Warren-Knox, who passed away following a battle with brain cancer in 2014.

In a highly personal news conference at the children’s hospital, Warren explained the impact his older sister had on his life and actions.

“My sister often talked of the struggles facing cancer patients, especially children and their families, and how she wished she could help; as a family we hope this fund can make a positive impact,” Warren noted. “We want to make sure these kids are taken care of … and do something to keep Carolyn’s torch alive, and that’s why we’re here today.”

Make a donation to the Carolyn’s Comforts Children’s Cancer Emergency Assistance Fund.


University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital Physician-in-Chief Joseph Neglia, MD, MPH and University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital President Kathie Taranto thanked Warren and his wife Greta on behalf of our patients and families for the gift.

Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist Brenda Weigel, MD, spoke to the effect the new assistance fund would have on families with a son or daughter being treated at the children’s hospital.

“As a physician in this program, I am keenly aware of the financial burden that a cancer diagnosis and the resulting treatment frequently places on patients and their family members. Given that treatment can last weeks and months—and in some cases up to two years—for many families this means reduced income as one parent either works less or has to quit their job,” Weigel said.

The money is already being used to help two families cover mortgage payments so parents can spend less time working and more time with their cancer-stricken child. The fund is helping another family pay for necessities like diapers and formula, while another patient is purchasing adaptive medical equipment that was not covered by insurance.

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